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July 7, 2022

Top tweets: Ukrainian missiles attacking Russian Rescue Tugs – and more

Naval Technology lists five of the top tweets on naval tech in Q2 2022 based on data from GlobalData’s Aerospace, Defence & Security Influencer Platform.

The top tweets are based on total engagements (likes and retweets) received on tweets from more than 188 naval tech experts tracked by GlobalData’s ADS Influencer platform during the second quarter (Q2) of 2022.

1. H I Sutton’s tweet on Ukrainian navy missiles attacking Russian Rescue Tugs

H I Sutton, a defence writer and analyst, tweeted on Ukrainian navy missiles attacking and destroying the Russian navy project 22870 Rescue Tug Spasatel Vasily Bekh (SB-739). Apart from boosting Ukraine’s morale, Rescue Tugs, are valid military targets and in the context of the of Snake Island, which is located in the Black Sea, are utility ships that are used for critical re-supply, Sutton explained.

Snake Island is strategically located, both militarily and economically, and is a part of Ukraine. The island plays a key role in demarcating Ukrainian territorial waters. Sutton further added that sea skimming anti-ship missiles like the Harpoon or Neptune may have been used to target the Russian vessels, but it is the supply of these missiles which is significant from a political and military standpoint. Reports have suggested that Ukraine’s anti-ship capacity may have been bolstered by supplies from Denmark, the UK, and the Netherlands.

Username: H I Sutton

Twitter handle: @CovertShores

Likes: 2,213

Retweets: 442

2. Chris Cavas’ tweet on the US Navy testing the new laser weapon system

Chris Cavas, a naval warfare journalist, shared an article on the US Navy testing an all-electric, high-energy laser weapon system called the Layered Laser Defence (LLD) to defeat a target that resembled the subsonic cruise missile in flight. Built by the American aerospace company Lockheed Martin , the weapon disabled and shot down an aerial drone in a test conducted sponsored by the office of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) located at the US Army’s High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility in New Mexico.

The weapon’s capabilities include countering unmanned aerial systems, as well as fast-attacking boats with high-power laser, the article noted. The weapon system also uses a high-resolution telescope to monitor in-bound air threats, supports combat identification, and also carries out battle damage evaluation of involved targets. It is compact, powerful, and efficient, and has specialised optics to focus on a target, while leveraging artificial intelligence (AI) to improve tracking and targeting, the article highlighted.

Username: Chris Cavas

Twitter handle: @CavasShips

Likes: 623

Retweets: 137

3. Deborah Haynes’ tweet on the crippling of the Russian cruiser Moskva

Deborah Haynes, a security and defence editor, tweeted on Moskva, the flagship of the Russian Black Sea fleet that was known to be the most powerful warship in the region to have caught fire after an Ukrainian missile strike or an accidental fire, according to a western official. This was a significant blow for the Russian military, with the western official casting doubt on Russian claims of not being aware of a previous fire onboard the warship that caused the ammunition magazine to explode.

The western official further stated that if it was an accident, then it was inept on the part of the Russian military. Contrarily, the official believed Ukraine’s claims of the Russian flagship to have been hit by the Neptune anti-ship missiles, Haynes tweeted. However, it was seen to be a massive blow to the Russian fleet that had been damaged to the point of being neither operable or under tow. The destruction of Moskva would significantly impact Russian maritime operations, the official added.

Username: Deborah Haynes

Twitter handle: @haynesdeborah

Likes: 241

Retweets: 32

4. Vice Admiral Arun Kumar Singh’s tweet on the Agnipath scheme

Vice Admiral Arun Kumar Singh, retired vice admiral at the Indian Navy, shared an article on the immediate modification of the Agnipath scheme for the Indian Armed Forces. He tweeted that the service should be extended from a period of four to seven years and retention should also increase from 25% to 33% for the Armed Forces. He further added that the four-year scheme may not be valid for most parts of the Army, but the Navy needed a longer duration of service and retention. Therefore, the scheme required more thought and change for a high-tech 3D service like the Indian Navy, which operated advanced warships, such as the Arihant-class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs), nuclear-powered attack submarines (SSNs), and hunter-killer submarines (SSKs).

Under the Agnipath scheme, 75% of the agniveers were expected to return to society at the end of four years, the article detailed. This implied that the Armed Forced would be losing human resources at a time when the trained soldiers would ideally be placed to form the business end of the stick. In addition, a huge section of weapon-trained individuals would be sent back to civilian life, many likely to have no stable job for the next four to five decades.    

Username: Vice Admiral Arun Kumar Singh

Twitter handle: @subnut

Likes: 210

Retweets: 63

5. Dr Phil Weir’s tweet on Russia using patrol boats to carry out covert operations

Dr Phil Weir, a historian, shared an article on Russian attack patrol boats racing up the Dnieper River to carry out of covert operations behind enemy territory, according to reports by a Ukrainian think tank. Fast attack boats such as the Russian Project 12150 Mangust was spotted at Kherson on the Dnipro River, which typically divides Russia from Ukraine. According to the Centre for Defence Studies (CDS ), boats had been speeding upstream to reach Ukraine’s capital Kyiv from the Russian-occupied Kherson city, the article further detailed.

The Dnieper is the fourth longest river in Europe, 13 miles wide at some points, thereby allowing Russian boats to creep into Ukrainian territory without being tracked, the article noted. Defence experts further added that the Russian special forces may be carrying out these riverine operations to identify targets for air strikes and artillery fire in cities, such as Dnipro, Kiev, and Zaporizhzhia.

Username: Dr Phil Weir

Twitter handle: @navalhistorian

Likes: 64

Retweets: 18

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