USS George Washington performs record-breaking fuelling-at-sea with USS Chafee


George Washington

The US Navy's Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) has successfully conducted fuelling-at-sea (FAS) with the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Chafee (DDG 90).

The latest FAS saw the delivery of 205,292gal of JP-5, which broke the record of approximately 33,000gal delivered by USS Abraham Lincoln to USS Cape St George (CG 71) in 2010.

George Washington fuels boatswain chief warrant officer 2 William Dinsmore said: "The typical amount of fuel passed during a normal evolution is between five and ten thousand gallons.

"In the past we have proved that we could refuel them (cruisers and destroyers) if we needed to, during this evolution we actually refuelled them."

The new development was successful with the support of hundreds of sailors working for several different departments, George Washington's 1st lieutenant commander Reza Chegini said.

In addition, Air Department's V-4 division contributed several man-hours in preparation for transferring the JP-5.

"The typical amount of fuel passed during a normal evolution is between five and ten thousand gallons."

Dinsmore added: "The major challenge to this evolution was getting the JP-5 from our forward-most service tanks to the one farthest aft.

"Normally, we would use our aft pump room, which would greatly reduce the distance the fuel had to travel, but we had to use our forward pump room because of the amount of fuel the Chafee requested."

In July, the US Marines Corps (USMC) introduced the joint automated deep operation coordination system (JADOCS) aboard USS George Washington.

JADOCS connects land and sea assets, in addition to providing a clear image that supports a combatant commander to make better tactical decisions. It also enhances communication between all allied resources and delivers more detail for real-world scenarios.


Image: The US Navy's Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). Photo: courtesy of mass communication specialist 2nd class Clifford L H Davis.