USS John S McCain completes repairs from 2017 collision

29 October 2019 (Last Updated October 29th, 2019 12:11)

The US Navy's Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John S McCain (DDG 56) is ready for at-sea testing after completing repairs.

USS John S McCain completes repairs from 2017 collision
The USS John S McCain (DDG 56) underway, 12 June 2017, conducting interoperability drills with the Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group. Credit: U.S. Navy.

The US Navy’s Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John S McCain (DDG 56) is ready for at-sea testing after completing repairs.

The tests will be conducted to evaluate the performance of the ship’s on-board systems.

Demonstrations will assess damage control, navigation, mechanical and electrical systems, communications, combat systems, and propulsion application.

John S McCain, assigned to Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN (DESRON 15) and forward-deployed to Yokosuka, Japan, was involved in an accident in 2017 off the coast of Singapore.

A collision with chemical tanker Alnic MC led to the death of ten sailors.

DDG 56 completed the in-port phase of training. The vessel will continue basic phase at-sea training in the coming months.

Destroyer Squadron 15 commander captain Steven DeMoss said: “The USS John S McCain embodies the absolute fighting spirit of her namesakes, and shows the resiliency of our sailors. She has completed her maintenance period with the most up-to-date multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities, preparing her to successfully execute a multitude of high-end operations.

“As a guided-missile destroyer assigned to Destroyer Squadron 15, the John S McCain is poised and ready to contribute to the lethal and combat ready forward-deployed naval force in the free and open Indo-Pacific region.”

The Arleigh Burke-class ship underwent upgrades to its antenna systems, radar array, computer network, combat weapons systems and berthing.

John S McCain’s commanding officer commander Ryan Easterday said: “This whole crew is eager to get back to sea, and that’s evident in the efforts they’ve made over the last two years to bring the ship back to fighting shape, and the energy they’ve put into preparing themselves for the rigors of at-sea operations.

“I’m extremely proud of them as we return the ship to sea, and return to the operational fleet more ready than ever to support security and stability throughout the region.”