SSC Atlantic tests new indoor gunshot detection system for DoD

16 October 2018 (Last Updated October 16th, 2018 18:33)

The US Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SSC) Atlantic team is testing, examining and evaluating a commercial-grade indoor gunshot detection system (IGDS) for the US Department of Defense (DoD).

SSC Atlantic tests new indoor gunshot detection system for DoD
The SSC Atlantic team performs a live fire demonstration with 628th Security Forces Squadron personnel. Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Joe Bullinger/Released.

The US Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SSC) Atlantic team is testing, examining and evaluating a commercial-grade indoor gunshot detection system (IGDS) for the US Department of Defense (DoD).

The project is being carried out under an Office of the Under Secretary of Defense sponsored initiative focused on active shooter detection.

Once successfully tested, the commercial-grade IGDS technology could be potentially used across all DoD facilities.

The technology has been designed to provide first responders with real-time notifications of gunshot incidents in a facility in order to facilitate a quick response.

Many of the systems can also provide important data on shooter location and movement to the security personnel.

“In the office type environment, cubicles are specifically designed to absorb and dampen sound and common office space furnishings can create blind spots and dampen the acoustics.”

SSC Atlantic information technology specialist Rodney Rourk said: “The deliverable product will be a technical package including engineering planning, training artifacts and a test report containing raw test results to be submitted to the Physical Security Enterprise and Analysis Group (PSEAG).

“From there the data is distributed to each of the four services for their application.”

Following an approval from the PSEAG, the SSC Atlantic engineers acquired and installed an IGDS in an SSC Atlantic facility on Joint Base (JB) Charleston to carry out testing on the system in an office setting.

Rourk added: “In the office type environment, cubicles are specifically designed to absorb and dampen sound and common office space furnishings can create blind spots and dampen the acoustics.

“During testing, we varied the sensor installation, ceiling mounts, wall mounts, and we tested multiple weapon types at many test points, with weapons discharged at varying heights, to ascertain the probability of detection and performance of the system.”

In addition to installation testing, another major phase of research included multiple live fire scenarios with JB Charleston first responders from the 628th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) and the 628th Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) flight.