US Navy’s future USS Indianapolis LCS concludes acceptance trials

28 June 2019 (Last Updated June 28th, 2019 11:44)

The US Navy's Freedom-class littoral combat ship (LCS) the future USS Indianapolis (LCS 17) has completed acceptance trials in Lake Michigan.

US Navy’s future USS Indianapolis LCS concludes acceptance trials
LCS 17 completed acceptance trials in Lake Michigan ahead of its planned commissioning in October. Credit: PRNewfoto/Lockheed Martin.

The US Navy’s Freedom-class littoral combat ship the future USS Indianapolis (LCS 17) has completed acceptance trials in Lake Michigan.

Completion of the trials represents the final step ahead of its delivery to the US Navy. It is planned to be commissioned in October.

The ninth Freedom-variant LCS is designed and been built by the Lockheed Martin-led industry team at Fincantieri Marinette Marine yard in Marinette, Wisconsin.

Lockheed Martin Small Combatants and Ship Systems vice-president and general manager Joe DePietro said: “LCS 17 is joining the second-largest class of ships in the US Navy fleet, and we are proud to get the newest littoral combat ship one step closer to delivery.

“This ship is lethal and flexible, and we are confident that she will capably serve critical US Navy missions today and in future.”

During acceptance trials, LCS 17 underwent a full-power run, manoeuvrability testing and surface and air detect-to-engage demonstrations of its combat system.

The trials tested major systems and features of the vessel, including aviation support, small boat launch handling, as well as recovery and machinery control and automation.

Fincantieri Marinette Marine president and CEO Jan Allman said: “I am extremely proud of our LCS team including our shipbuilders at Fincantieri Marinette Marine. These are complex vessels, and it takes a strong team effort to design, build and test these American warships.”

LCS is an automated combat ship that can deliver dominance in near-shore environments. The flexible hull design allows for modification to integrate capabilities including over-the-horizon missiles, advanced electronic warfare systems and decoys.

The vessel can cruise at speeds of more than 40k. It is armed with rolling airframe missiles (RAM) and an Mk110 gun that can fire 220 rounds a minute.

Earlier this month, the Lockheed Martin-led team launched LCS 21, the future USS Minneapolis-Saint Paul.