Royal Canadian Navy receives delivery of second AOPS patrol ship
Join Our Newsletter - Get important industry news and analysis sent to your inbox – sign up to our e-Newsletter here
X

Royal Canadian Navy receives delivery of second AOPS patrol ship

16 Jul 2021 (Last Updated July 16th, 2021 15:21)

In 2015, Irving Shipbuilding was awarded a $2.3bn contract to build six Arctic and offshore patrol ships.

Royal Canadian Navy receives delivery of second AOPS patrol ship
Aerial view of the future HMCS Margaret Brooke being moved from the Bedford Basin to Irving Shipyard in Halifax. Credit: National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces.

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) has officially received delivery of its second Arctic and offshore patrol ship (AOPS), HMCS Margaret Brooke, on 15 July.

HMCS Margaret Brooke is the second of six Harry DeWolf-class AOPSs being built by Irving Shipbuilding for the RCN.

The Canadian shipbuilder was awarded a $2.3bn contract to build these six AOPSs in January 2015 as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS).

The patrol vessels will be deployed to carry out armed seaborne surveillance in the country’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ), in addition to the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic coasts.

Last month, RCN officially commissioned its first AOPS ‘HMCS Harry DeWolf’.

Construction of the third, fourth and fifth AOPS is currently underway while construction of the sixth ship is expected to start next year.

Minister of Public Services and Procurement Canada Anita Anand said: “The National Shipbuilding Strategy continues to create and generate economic benefits in communities and across Canada while providing the members of the Royal Canadian Navy with the ships they need to carry out their important work for Canadians.”

HMCS Margaret Brooke will stay docked at Jetty NJ at the CFB Halifax Dockyard until the completion of post-acceptance work and final ship preparation.

The ship’s naming ceremony is expected to be held later this year and a formal commissioning ceremony is expected next year as the ship officially comes online with RCN service.

The AOPS is a 103m-long vessel with a 19m-long beam. It will boost the Canadian Navy’s presence in the Arctic and its global operating ability.

Royal Canadian Navy commander vice-admiral Craig Baines said: “The Royal Canadian Navy is thrilled to see the arrival of the second Arctic and offshore patrol ship, the future HMCS Margaret Brooke.

“I know that its captain, commander Nicole Robichaud, and crew have been eagerly awaiting this day, and all of the milestones to come, as their ship is brought into service and readied to add to the capabilities of our fleet at home and abroad.”