Rolls-Royce wins Royal Navy’s Type-23 frigate engine contract

8 July 2019 (Last Updated August 6th, 2019 14:51)

Rolls-Royce has received a contract to perform maintenance on the British Royal Navy's Type-23 frigate fleet engines. 

Rolls-Royce wins Royal Navy’s Type-23 frigate engine contract
The British Royal Navy’s Duke-class Type-23 frigate HMS Monmouth. Credit: LA(Phot) Stuart Hill/MoD.

Rolls-Royce has received a contract to perform maintenance on the British Royal Navy’s Type-23 frigate fleet engines.

Under the £85m contract awarded by the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD), Rolls-Royce will deliver a comprehensive support package to Spey gas turbines.

The contract includes the overhaul of engines, provision of spares, as well as engineering and safety support.

Rolls-Royce will overhaul 30 Type-23 engines from the UK and Nato member states, including Belgium, Portugal, and the Netherlands.

The MoD stated that overhaul of the turbines is a key initiative as they boost propulsion in the Type-23 frigates and serve as a vital component for anti-submarine warfare.

UK Defence Minister Stuart Andrew said: “This £85m contract demonstrates the UK’s commitment to modernisation through the maintenance of our formidable Type-23s.

“This work continues the British tradition of supporting our closest allies and solidifying our global position as world-leaders in advanced maritime technology and development.”

The Type-23 frigates can be used to perform a range of operations such as securing the UK’s maritime trade routes east of the Suez Canal, and safeguarding British interests in the South Atlantic.

Rolls-Royce will be responsible for project management of the support contract. Scotland-based RWG will undertake the main overhaul and repair work.

Rolls-Royce naval fleet services director Matt Nadin said: “This vital support contract builds upon our Rolls-Royce target to achieve and sustain increased Spey engine availability to the Royal Navy and their Nato partners, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Portugal.”

The contract is expected to allow the navy to cut costs and time related to overhauls.

The company will continue its focus on improving repair schemes, minimising unnecessary work and procuring spares cheaper.