Raytheon wins $570.5m contract to support RCN ships and sailors

31 January 2018 (Last Updated January 31st, 2018 12:12)

The Government of Canada has awarded a new C$704m ($570.5m) contract in support of weapons systems that are intended to help protect Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) ships and sailors over the next two decades.

The Government of Canada has awarded a new C$704m ($570.5m) contract in support of weapons systems that are intended to help protect Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) ships and sailors over the next two decades.

The deal has been awarded to Raytheon Canada and is expected to generate and sustain more than 450 skilled job opportunities across the country.

Canadian Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains said: “As a result of the government’s Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy (ITB) policy, Raytheon Canada will make important investments in Canada to support well-paying, middle-class jobs, foster economic growth and help spur innovation across the country in small and medium enterprises.

"Raytheon Canada will make important investments in Canada to support well-paying, middle-class jobs, foster economic growth and help spur innovation across the country."

“That’s how we ensure innovation works for all Canadians.”

Raytheon will be responsible for modernising and supporting 21 rapid-fire, radar-guided gun systems for the Canadian Navy as part of the agreement.

The new gun systems have the capability to deliver effective naval self-defence to protect against close-in threats such as missiles, small vessels and aircraft.

The close-in weapons system (CIWS) are currently integrated on-board the RCN’s Halifax-class frigates and will be deployed on the navy’s Protecteur-class joint support ships following the completion of their construction.

RCN’s CIWS in-service support contract is signed for an initial service period of ten years, with three options of five, three and two additional years respectively.

It is scheduled to be valid until late-2037.

The CIWS is currently deployed across 24 countries and offers a level of interoperability that would enable the Canadian Navy to take advantage of future enhancements planned to be carried out by the allies.