US Navy’s San Antonio-class USS John P Murtha (LPD 26) completes builder’s trials

7 March 2016 (Last Updated March 7th, 2016 18:30)

The US Navy's tenth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock John P Murtha (LPD 26) has successfully completed builder's trials.

The US Navy's tenth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock John P Murtha (LPD 26) has successfully completed builder's trials.

US Program Executive Office, Ships, LPD 17 Class programme manager captain Darren Plath said: "The ship has met another critical milestone as it progresses toward acceptance trials, delivery, and eventual service with the fleet."

Supervisor of Shipbuilding captain Joe Tuite added: "With the launching of LPD 27 last month and the completion of LPD 26 Builder's Trials this week, our government / industry team has met every challenge in a busy schedule.

“Our team completed over 750 tests leading up this week and assessed the operability of the ship through over 240 separate events during the six-day trial.”

"To achieve a successful trial, our team completed over 750 tests leading up this week and assessed the operability of the ship through over 240 separate events during the six-day trial. They assessed everything from lowering the stern gate to operating the anchor ensuring the future USS John P Murtha will be combat ready."

During the four-day trial, the ship conducted a series of testing and at-sea demonstrations, including a full power run, self-defence detect-to-engage exercise, evaluation of key combat and communications systems, rapid ballast / de-ballast operations, steering checks, and anchor handling demonstration.

Following the completion of the trials, the ship is now ready for full testing demonstrations with the US Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV).

John P Murtha is scheduled to be commissioned this autumn and will be homeported in San Diego, US.

The 684ft-long San Antonio-class ships have a displacement capacity of 25,000t and more than 23,000ft² of vehicle storage, capable of transporting a landing force of up to 800 marines and their equipment.

The 11 ships will functionally replace more than 41 ships across four classes, providing the navy and marine corps with modern, sea-based platforms.