US Navy’s RAM Block 2 completes first phase of developmental trials

30 May 2013 (Last Updated May 30th, 2013 18:30)

US Navy and Raytheon have successfully completed the first phase of developmental and operational testing (DT/OT) of Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) Block 2, validating its capability.

 RAM launcher

US Navy and Raytheon have successfully completed the first phase of developmental and operational testing (DT/OT) of Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) Block 2, validating its capability.

During at-sea testing, the RAM Block 2 missile was launched twice from the US Navy's selfdefense test ship, to hit two targets and demonstrated its advanced missile's defensive capabilities.

All four RAM missiles successfully engaged high-speed, manoeuvring and sub-sonic targets while meeting all the objectives of the DT/OT tests.

Trials form part of the second low-rate initial production contract award to Raytheon in December 2012 for delivery of 61 RAM Block 2 missiles for the US Navy.

Raytheon Missile Systems naval and area mission defence product line vice-president Rick Nelson said that the RAM Block 2 missile has undergone a series of guidance test vehicle flight tests prior to completion of developmental tests.

"RAM Block 2's increased kinematic capability and its advanced guidance system will continue to give the warfighter an unfair advantage in the fight," Nelson said.

"RAM Block 2's increased kinematic capability and its advanced guidance system will continue to give the warfighter an unfair advantage in the fight."

RAM Block 2 is an upgrade of its predecessor and a supersonic, lightweight, quick reaction missile.

Updates to the RAM Block 2 involves a four-axis independent control actuator system, passive radio frequency seeker, a digital autopilot and engineering changes in selected infrared seeker components.

Co-developed and co-produced by the US and Germany under the international cooperative programme, the RAM guided-missile weapon system can strike against anti-ship cruise missiles, helicopter and airborne threats, as well as hostile surface craft.

The RAM missile is currently deployed as an integral self-defence weapon onboard more than 165 ships for the navies of Egypt, Germany, Greece, Japan, South Korea, Turkey, the UAE and the US.


Image: USS Green Bay's RAM launcher fires a surface to air intercept missile. Photo: courtesy of US Navy, by mass communication specialist 1st class Larry S Carlson/Released.

Defence Technology