US Navy receives LM2500 gas turbines from GE Marine

15 May 2012 (Last Updated May 15th, 2012 18:30)

The US Navy has taken delivery of eight LM2500 aero-derivative marine gas turbines from GE Marine that will power Arleigh Burke-class DDG 113 and DDG 115 destroyers as part of the DDG 51 restart programme.

US Navy Arleigh Burke Class destroyersThe US Navy has taken delivery of eight LM2500 aero-derivative marine gas turbines from GE Marine that will power Arleigh Burke-class DDG 113 and DDG 115 destroyers as part of the DDG 51 restart programme.

The Navy has implemented the proposed LM2500 common engine by GE following the start of the DDG 51 restart programme.

GE Marine general manager Brien Bolsinger said: "The US Navy's adoption of the LM2500 common engine program allows GE to leverage the LM2500 industrial volume to control cost, and improve manufacturing and durability, as well as spare parts lead times, in support of the US Navy fleet."

Upgrades to the LM2500 compressor rotor, the turbine mid-frame, the compressor rear frame and the power turbine will be carried out as part of common engine improvements within the gas turbine to avoid causing interference to ship interfaces or on-ship maintenance activities.

“The new configuration has been recertified to US Navy Mil 901D shock, and we expect to introduce the common engine program to international naval customers over the next several years."

Preserving the LM2500 tradition of improving marine gas turbines, enhanced configurations are also included to the common engine.

Improvements to marine configurations are possible as the LM2500 industrial engine operates more than 8,000 hours a year when compared with more than over 200,000 hours of operation delivered by high time engines.

"The new configuration has been recertified to US Navy Mil 901D shock, and we expect to introduce the common engine program to international naval customers over the next several years," Bolsinger added.

The navy had received four LM2500 gas turbines from GE in late 2011 for the DDG 113 frigate, while the four additional turbines of the same type for the DDG 115 were delivered in February 2012.

Manufacturing of the gas turbine engine will be carried out at GE's Evendale, Ohio, facility and more than 700 LM2500 gas turbines have been delivered to the navy for operating aboard surface combatantsm, such as frigates and destroyers.


Image: The DDG 51 programme was reopened after shortening the DDG 1000 Zumwalt programme at two ships. Photo: courtesy of Bryant Midura.