US Navy opens new submarine firefighting trainer in Guam

29 August 2016 (Last Updated August 29th, 2016 18:30)

The US Naval Submarine Training Center Pacific (NSTCP) detachment has opened the new Mobile Trainer (MT) 1000 submarine firefighting trainer on Polaris Point in Guam, US.

The US Naval Submarine Training Center Pacific (NSTCP) detachment has opened the new Mobile Trainer (MT) 1000 submarine firefighting trainer on Polaris Point in Guam, US.

The new firefighting trainer has been designed to train service members in both basic firefighting and responsive team training, with the aim of enhancing the casualty response of forward deployed units in the Western Pacific.

The MT-1000 features two fireplaces, one of which simulates a switchboard electrical fire, and the other a bilge fire along with a flashover capability that shoots propane across the ceiling, resulting in a rapid increase of the temperature inside.

"The addition of the MT-1000 reinforces the navy's commitment to ensure our submarine force is trained to the highest degree of readiness."

Built by Kidde Fire Trainers, it can run until temperatures reach up to 700°f at 5ft above the deck.

NSTCP det Guam officer in charge lieutenant commander Jarrod Trant said: "The addition of the MT-1000 reinforces the navy's commitment to ensure our submarine force is trained to the highest degree of readiness and that our crews are ready to handle emergency situations underway.

"The MT-1000 is the newest, hottest firefighter trainer in the US Navy, putting our front line submariners through rigorous firefighting scenarios, which provides invaluable training."

Two hose teams, made up of four sailors, can be trained at the new facility, where training is routinely conducted at around 200°f-300°f.

The MT-1000 also features a side watertight door and topside hatch over a vertical ladder to simulate firefighting conditions and accesses on submarines. It is also fitted with moveable metal panels to simulate different scenarios.

The trainer is currently undergoing acceptance testing and is expected to be ready to train submariners by next month.