US Navy’s eighth LPD 17 class ship completes acceptance trials

7 November 2012 (Last Updated November 7th, 2012 03:40)

The US Navy's eighth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship, Arlington (LPD 24), has successfully completed sea acceptance trials (SAT) in the Gulf of Mexico, marking a step towards its delivery.

LPD 24

The US Navy's eighth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship, Arlington (LPD 24), has successfully completed sea acceptance trials (SAT) in the Gulf of Mexico, marking a step towards its delivery.

More than 200 demonstrations took place during the three-day trials, with the ship's systems evaluated by the US Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV).

The trials involved testing of a variety of systems, such as main propulsion engineering and ship controls, combat and communications, as well as damage control.

As well as various mission systems, the frigate validated its electronic backbone, the shipboard wide area network.

It also displayed its full power run, self-defence detect-to-engage exercises, steering checks, quick reversal (crash-back), boat handling, and anchoring, in addition to ballasting and de-ballasting the well deck.

"More than 200 demonstrations took place during the three-day trials, with the ship's systems evaluated by the US Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey.”

The SAT was conducted by INSURV, Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), Supervisor of Shipbuilding (SUPSHIP) Gulf Coast, experts from Naval Sea Systems Command and Arlington's crew.

Capable of carrying a crew of up to 800 while cruising at a speed of 22k, LPD 24 can transport air cushion (LCAC) or conventional landing crafts, as well as helicopters and the Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft.

The LPD 17-class ships will replace more than 41 vessels currently in-service with the US Navy, including the Austin-class (LPD 4), Anchorage-class (LSD 36), Charleston-class (LKA 113) and Newport-class (LST 1179) of amphibious ships.

Powered by four turbo-charged diesel engines, the 684ft-long, 24,900t vessel features an advanced command-and-control suite and enhanced survivability capabilities.

The ship has been designed to carry out amphibious assaults, special operations and expeditionary warfare missions during the first half of the 21st century.


Image: Arlington (LPD 24) in formation with Anchorage (LPD 23) following completion of acceptance trials. Photo: courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries.