Delivery of Zumwalt-class destroyers delayed

11 March 2015 (Last Updated March 11th, 2015 18:30)

The delivery of the US Navy's first two Zumwalt-class (DDG 1000) guided-missile destroyers has been delayed.

Zumwalt-class

The delivery of the US Navy's first two Zumwalt-class (DDG 1000) guided-missile destroyers has been delayed.

The vessels are currently under construction at General Dynamics' Bath Iron Works (BIW) shipyard.

USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) was originally scheduled to be delivered later this year, but is now expected to be handed over to the navy in November.

Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), the second destroyer, will be delivered in November 2016. The delivery of Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002), in December 2018, remains on schedule.

In a statement, navy acquisition directorate spokesperson commander Thurraya Kent said: "The schedule delay is due primarily to the challenges encountered with completing installation, integration and testing of the highly unique, leading-edge technology designed into this first-of-class warship.

"The schedule delay is due primarily to the challenges encountered with completing installation, integration and testing."

"[The] navy and General Dynamics BIW continue to work together in evaluating schedule impacts for all ships under construction in Bath, Maine, which also includes ships under construction for the Aegis-class destroyer programme.

"Both the navy and BIW are committed to collectively managing risks and controlling costs to deliver both DDG 1000 and DDG 51-class ships to the fleet in the most efficient manner possible."

The 610ft-long Zumwalt multi-mission surface combatants have a displacement capacity of more than 15,000t when fully loaded and are designed for littoral operations and land attack.

Featuring new technologies that provide capabilities now and for incorporation into future ships, the destroyers are equipped with highly survivable integrated power systems.


Image: The Zumwalt-class destroyer DDG 1000 floated out of the dry dock at the BIW shipyard. Photo: courtesy of the US Navy.