US Navy and Australia sign cooperation agreement to develop alternative fuels

22 August 2016 (Last Updated August 22nd, 2016 18:30)

Australia’s Queensland and the US Navy have signed a cooperation agreement to support and advance projects and initiatives related to alternative fuels development.

Australia’s Queensland and the US Navy have signed a cooperation agreement to support and advance projects and initiatives related to alternative fuels development.

The agreement follows events that were recently held in Australia to promote the US navy's energy efficiency efforts.

The development is part of the Great Green Fleet initiative, which outlines the US navy’s commitment to source 50% of fuel from renewable sources by 2020.

It also seeks to highlight how energy efficient technology and procedures and alternative energy can allow US navy ships to go farther, stay longer and deliver more firepower.

"That is what is most exciting for us, is how these fuels that are developed here can be used not only for ourselves, but in private industry as well."

According to the agreement, the US Navy and Queensland will discuss the research, development, supply and sale of alternative fuels, with an aim to enhance operational flexibility and save energy.

US Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy for Management Thomas Hicks said: "That is what is most exciting for us, is how these fuels that are developed here can be used not only for ourselves, but in private industry as well."

During the Great Green Fleet events in Australia, discussions were held on the clean energy sector aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Stethem (DDG 63).

Hicks had also discussed the US Navy’s initiatives taken for energy and energy efficiency measures, as well as insisting that research be conducted on the potential benefits of alternative fuel.


Image: Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and US Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy for Management Thomas Hicks sign agreement. Photo: courtesy of US Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Hendrick Simoes.