Russia’s two Buyan-class corvettes to join Caspian flotilla by July

1 May 2014 (Last Updated May 1st, 2014 18:30)

The Russia Navy's two latest project 21631 Buyan-M-class missile corvettes, the Grad Sviyazhsk and the Uglich, have successfully completed their sea trials and are set to be assigned to the Caspian flotilla by July.

Caspian Corvette.

The Russia Navy's two latest project 21631 Buyan-M-class missile corvettes, the Grad Sviyazhsk and the Uglich, have successfully completed their sea trials and are set to be assigned to the Caspian flotilla by July.

A Russian Southern Military district spokesperson was quoted by RIA Novosti as saying: "Most likely, they will be assigned to the Caspian flotilla by 1 July."

A total of nine project 21631 Buyan-M corvettes have been ordered by the Russian Defence Ministry for the navy, six of which would be assigned to boost the Caspian flotilla's capability.

The Grad Sviyazhsk and the Uglich, the first corvettes to join the flotilla, were commissioned in early 2014.

The missile corvettes are powered by a twin-screw combined diesel and diesel (CODAD) propulsion system, comprising two Zvezda M520 radial 56-cylinder diesel engines, which drive two pump-jet propulsors.

"A total of nine project 21631 Buyan-M corvettes have been ordered by the Russian Defence Ministry for the navy."

With a displacement capacity of 949t and a range of 1,500nm, the Buyan corvettes offer a maximum cruising speed of 28k and are armed with Kalibr (SS-N-27) anti-ship missiles, 100mm and 30mm guns and Igla-1M air defence systems.

As part of a broader strategy to boost the Caspian flotilla's capability, the Russian Navy is also planning to procure a Grachonok-class patrol boat, some Serna-class landing craft, and three tugboats to defend offshore economic zones and combat enemy warships in littoral zones.

Previously, the United Shipbuilding state defence contracts department head Anatoly Shlemov noted that the Russian Navy would receive ten warships in 2014.


Image: The Russian Navy's Buyan-class ship at sea. Photo: courtesy of Vissarion.

Defence Technology