Russia successfully tests Sineva intercontinental missile from submerged submarine

5 November 2014 (Last Updated November 5th, 2014 18:30)

Russia has successfully test-fired a Sineva intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) from Northern Fleet nuclear submarine, Tula, in the Barents Sea, marking a second test within a week, following the test-firing of a Bulava ICBM.

Russia has successfully test-fired a Sineva intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) from Northern Fleet nuclear submarine, Tula, in the Barents Sea, marking a second test within a week, following the test-firing of a Bulava ICBM.

Aimed at assessing the reliability of the navy's strategic forces, the new missile successfully hit the intended target at the Kura test range in Kamchatka, Russian Far East, complying with the required parameters of the flight trajectory, RIA Novosti reported.

"The new missile successfully hit the intended target at the Kura test range in Kamchatka, Russian Far East."

RIA Novosti quoted the Russian Defence Ministry statement as saying: "Within the frameworks of testing the reliability of marine strategic nuclear forces, the Tula launched a Sineva intercontinental ballistic missile from the Barents Sea to the Kura Range."

Commissioned in 2007 as part of efforts to improve Russia's nuclear deterrent, the liquid-fuelled missile can carry nuclear warheads and offer a range of approximately 12,000km.

The RSM-54 ICBM, which forms part of the D-9RM launch system, completed flight tests in 2004, and was deployed by the Russian Navy in 2007.

Last week, a Bulava ICBM was test-fired from the nuclear-powered Borey-class Yury Dolgoruky submarine, marking its first operational test in the combat training programme.

The tests are aimed at transforming the Bulava into an essential nuclear warhead for Borey-class ballistic missile submarines. The missile will replace the navy's ageing Delta III, Delta IV and Typhoon classes.

Defence Technology