Royal Canadian Navy to name new AOPS as Frédérick Rolette

19 July 2015 (Last Updated July 19th, 2015 18:30)

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) has announced that it will name one of its new DeWolf-class arctic / offshore patrol ship (AOPS) after French-Canadian naval officer Frédérick Rolette.

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) has announced that it will name one of its new DeWolf-class arctic / offshore patrol ship (AOPS) after French-Canadian naval officer Frédérick Rolette.

Lieutenant Rolette, who commanded the Canadian ship General Hunter at the start of the War of 1812, is credited with capturing an American vessel, which provided key intelligence for the British.

In addition, in the Battle of Lake Erie Rolette assumed command of the British schooner Lady Prevost and fought the ship until he himself was severely wounded, burned by an explosion, and the ship was a broken unmanageable and sinking wreck.

When the war ended, Rolette was presented with a fifty-guinea sword of honour by citizens of Québec City in recognition of his service.

Canadian Minister of National Defence Jason Kenney said: "Lieutenant Rolette served our country with great distinction throughout the War of 1812.

"Naming a Royal Canadian Navy ship after him honours the bravery and valour this great French-Canadian exhibited throughout his career.

"Lieutenant Rolette served our country with great distinction throughout the War of 1812."

"The Government of Canada remains committed to recognising the service and sacrifice of all men and women in uniform, both past and present."

The Canadian Government awarded a $2.3bn DeWolf-class AOPS construction contract to Nova Scotia-based Irving Shipbuilding in January this year.

The agreement is for six vessels and marks the start of the construction phase of the national shipbuilding procurement strategy (NSPS).

The lead ship will be named HMCS Harry DeWolf and the second vessel as Margaret Brooke.

The new DeWolf-class AOPS are being designed to play a critical role in protecting Canada's offshore sovereignty in the Atlantic, Pacific, and the Arctic.

Equipped with advanced sensors, the vessel will operate and support the new Cyclone naval helicopters. It will also be capable of operating in ice up to 1m thick and sustain operations for up to four months.