Raytheon to further support US Navy’s Zumwalt-class DDG 1000 programme

16 December 2013 (Last Updated December 16th, 2013 18:30)

Raytheon has received a contract from the US Navy to complete the remaining hardware and electronics for first two ships of the Zumwalt-class of multimission destroyers, DDG 1000 and DDG 1001.

Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer DDG 1000 is floated out of dry dock

Raytheon has received a contract from the US Navy to complete the remaining hardware and electronics for first two ships of the Zumwalt-class of multimission destroyers, DDG 1000 and DDG 1001.

Under the $75m contract, which is an exercised option under a previously awarded US Navy contract, Raytheon will complete outstanding hardware and electronics production and assembly for the first two ships of the class.

The company will provide electronics for the multi-function towed array for the sonar suite, canister electronics and uptake kits for the MK 57 vertical launching system and the advanced procurement of electronic modular enclosure shelters for the third ship, DDG 1002.

Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems' seapower capability systems business area vice-president, Kevin Peppe, said: "As systems and deliveries complete and integration and testing continue, we are advancing closer to demonstrating the capabilities of the most technologically advanced surface combatant in naval history."

"We are advancing closer to demonstrating the capabilities of the most technologically advanced surface combatant in naval history."

As the prime mission systems integrator for DDG 1000, Raytheon will provide all electronic and combat systems for the programme.

With the first MK 57 vertical launch system and the first integrated undersea warfare suite, with dual-frequency and hull-mounted sonars installed, the DDG 1000 entered the water in October 2013 at Bath Iron Works, Maine, US.

More than 95% of production is complete for DDG 1001.

The first of three Zumwalt-class destroyers will provide independent forward presence and deterrence, support special operations forces and operate as part of joint and combined expeditionary forces.

Designed for sustained operations in the littorals and land attack, the multi-mission ships feature optimal manning through human systems integration, improved quality of life, low operations and support costs, multi-spectral signature reduction, balanced warfighting design, survivability and adaptability.


Image: US Navy's Zumwalt-class vessel DDG 1000 is floated out of dry dock. Photo: courtesy of General Dynamics.

Defence Technology