NUSHIP Canberra equipped with Typhoon stabilised weapons systems

2 January 2014 (Last Updated January 2nd, 2014 18:30)

The Royal Australian Navy's first Canberra-class landing helicopter dock (LHD) ship, NUSHIP Canberra, has been successfully installed with four Typhoon stabilised weapons systems, marking another milestone for the project.

Canberra’s force protection weapon

The Royal Australian Navy's (RAN) first Canberra-class landing helicopter dock (LHD) ship, NUSHIP Canberra, has been successfully installed with four Typhoon stabilised weapons systems, marking another milestone for the project.

The advanced weapons system of the vessel includes a 25mm M242 Bushmaster chain gun and a coaxially mounted M240 7.62mm machine gun.

Canberra gunnery officer, lieutenant Adam Simeoni said the Typhoon weapons system is smaller than the main gun deployed aboard a guided missile frigate and has high rate of fire and decent sized rounds.

"While higher rates of fire are usually associated with small 'person-operated' automatic machine guns, the Typhoon has a much larger round," Simeoni continued.

"This combination provides Canberra with a very effective and potent force protection weapons system, specifically suited to the requirements of the LHD platform,' he said.

The Typhoon weapon system has been designed to operate from the operations room through the combat management system (SAAB 9LV Mk4) or from the independent remote operating consoles, also located in the operations room.

"The Typhoon provides an increased level of functionality … featuring capabilities not before seen in the RAN."

"When operated through the combat management system, the Typhoon provides an increased level of functionality that boosts its effectiveness as an all-round force protection defence system featuring capabilities not before seen in the RAN."

Boatswains Mates and Combat System Operators will operate the Typhoon depending on the mode of operation, while a team of three electronic technician (weapons) personnel will maintain the guns.

"The operators and maintainers have all completed the courses on how to maintain and operate the weapons system and are raring to go," Simeoni further said.

The Australian Navy will test and operate the system during first of class sea trials.


Image: HMAS Canberra's force protection weapons system. Photo: courtesy of the Royal Australian Navy.

Defence Technology