Lockheed and Midé develop new sensor technology for US Navy’s AWS

5 February 2014 (Last Updated February 5th, 2014 18:30)

Lockheed Martin and Midé have developed new sensor technology for the US Navy’s Aegis Weapon System (AWS), through the federally-funded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) programme.

Lockheed Martin and Midé have developed new sensor technology for the US Navy's Aegis Weapon System (AWS), through the federally-funded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) programme.

The AWS is a centralised, automated, command-and-control and weapons control system developed as a total weapon system, from detection to kill.

Lockheed Martin senior vice-president and chief technology officer Dr Ray Johnson said: "In the last ten years, we have been able to transition about a dozen projects to the commercialisation phase, making this a major accomplishment not only for our partnership with Midé, but for the benefit of our customers."

"In the last ten years, we have been able to transition about a dozen projects to the commercialisation phase."

The SBIR programme comprises three-phased award process which includes Phase I to support exploration of an idea or technology, phase II to develop and evaluate its commercial potential and phase III to facilitate product commercialisation.

The Midé-developed technology, known as novel piezoelectric sensors, has been designed to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, strain, or force by converting them to an electrical charge while providing a unique capability on tactical equipment.

Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training business small business programme manager Jeff MacBride said: "This particular technology integration illustrates how Lockheed Martin is effectively leveraging innovative, third-party concepts and developing them into capabilities that affordably meet the needs of troops."

The AWS comprises the AN/SPY-1, an advanced, automatic detect and track, multi-function phased-array radar to conduct search, track, and missile guidance functions simultaneously, with a track capacity of more than 100 targets.

Defence Technology