Insitu to deliver ScanEagle UAS for Singapore Navy

10 July 2012 (Last Updated July 10th, 2012 18:30)

Insitu Pacific has secured a contract by the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) for the supply of the ScanEagle unmanned aircraft system (UAS) for the use on missile corvettes.

Scaneagle UAS

Insitu Pacific has secured a contract by the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) for the supply of the ScanEagle unmanned aircraft system (UAS) for the use on missile corvettes.

Under the contract, the company will also provide training, logistics, as well as ship installation and specialist in-country maintenance support for the catapult-launched UAS.

An intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) solution, the ScanEagle UAS has a flexible range of payload options and can be used in conjunction with rotary wing platforms to provide situational awareness.

Insitu Pacific managing director Andrew Duggan said that the ScanEagle was expected to provide organic ISR capability with operational advantages for navy commanders.

Used for maritime operations, the UAS can operate from small vessels, such as corvettes and patrol boats, which do not have a helicopter deck or hangar storage space.

"ScanEagle is unique in that it is the only proven fixed wing UAS solution operating from ships in the world today with over 23,000 shipborne flight hours globally," Duggan added.

“ScanEagle is unique in that it is the only proven fixed wing UAS solution operating from ships in the world today with over 23,000 shipborne flight hours globally."

"This is critical on frigates and smaller combatants where there is often only space to embark and operate one rotary wing platform at a time."

Jointly developed by Boeing and Insitu, the ScanEagle UAS can run for more than 24 hours and can also be used for special services operations, escort operations, protection of sea-lane and convoy, high-value and secure installations, as well as the relay of high-speed wireless voice, video and data communications.

Equipped with Guidestar 111 control and navigation sensor, the air vehicle has a range of 1,500km and can achieve a maximum altitude of 16,000ft while cruising at a speed of 90km an hour in level flight.

The RSN had recently conducted sea trials with ScanEagle UAS to validate its improved situational awareness capability at sea.


Image: A ScanEagle USA set for launch from a catapult launcher. Photo: courtesy of gunnery sergeant Shannon Arledge of the 2nd marine aircraft wing.