GDLS’s MPC completes swim and human factors trials for USMC

9 June 2013 (Last Updated June 9th, 2013 18:30)

General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) has successfully completed water performance swim and human factors testing of its marine personnel carrier (MPC) vehicle for the US Marine Corps' (USMC) at Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch (AVTB), in Camp Pendleton, California.

Marine Personnel Carrier technology demonstrator.

General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) has successfully completed water performance swim and human factors testing of its marine personnel carrier (MPC) vehicle for the US Marine Corps' (USMC) at Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch (AVTB), in Camp Pendleton, California.

During the trials, the vehicle demonstrated features such as troop egress and component storage, reserve buoyancy, centre of gravity, water manoeuvrability, hydrodynamic stability, ocean speed into head seas and surf transit capabilities.

By carrying 12 marines and their equipment, the MPC provided substantial stability and safety for amphibious tactical movements, while validating its buoyancy at the fully armoured combat weight.

General Dynamics Land Systems US Marine Corps and Navy business sector senior vice-president Michael Bolon said that the vehicle demonstrated its ability to meet the MPC vehicle requirements for the USMC during the testing.

"Our vehicle clearly demonstrated it has the amphibious capabilities that the marines seek with the required outstanding survivability."

"Our vehicle clearly demonstrated it has the amphibious capabilities that the marines seek with the required outstanding survivability," Bolon added.

The vehicle features double-V hull to provide unmatched protection levels for improved survivability and also provides land mobility capabilities compatible with the GDLS-built M1A1 Abrams main battle tank.

Capable of providing strong swimming capability while accommodating crew, troop and equipment, the vehicle has been designed based on the light armoured vehicle III (LAV III) family of vehicles and can maintain a stable waterborne attitude for all swimming and surf-penetration manoeuvres.


Image: A US Marine Corp's Marine Personnel Carrier technology demonstrator. Photo: courtesy of US Marine Corps.

Defence Technology