Cobham receives US Navy’s V-22 refuelling probes orders

20 February 2014 (Last Updated February 20th, 2014 18:30)

Cobham has received the first two annual lots for the delivery of refuelling probes for the V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft in support of the second V-22 multiyear award from the US Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR).

 MV-22 Osprey

Cobham has received the first two annual lots for the delivery of refuelling probes for the V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft in support of the second V-22 multiyear award from the US Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR).

The orders follow memorandum of understanding (MOU) signed by Boeing and Cobham in June 2013.

Designed to withstand severe operating environments, Cobham's refuelling probe is fundamental to the Bell Boeing V-22 aircraft's self-deployment capability and operational range.

In addition to refuelling probe, Cobham's ship set includes antennas, aircrew restraints, emergency landing gear blow down equipment and on-board oxygen and inert gas generation systems.

Cobham mission equipment vice-president Iain Gibson said: "We are committed to providing Boeing with our ongoing support for the programme.

"The Cobham probe provides a proven aerial refuelling solution which further extends the mission performance of the V-22."

The MV-22 Osprey vertical and short take-off and landing (V/STOL) aircraft will support the US Marine Corps' missions including transportation of troops, equipment, and supplies from ships and land bases for combat assault and assault support.

Capable of operating as a helicopter or a turboprop aircraft, MV-22B Osprey will replace the CH-46E Sea Knight assault support helicopter for the US Marine Corps.

Probes will be equipped aboard the future US Marine Corps MV-22 models as well as on the US Air Force Special Operations Command CV-22 models, which can conduct missions such as long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces.


Image: An MV-22 Osprey readies to take off from an aircraft carrier. Photo: courtesy of US Navy mass communication specialist seaman Nicholas Frank Cottone/Released.

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