Brazil seeks assault amphibious vehicles from US

3 August 2012 (Last Updated August 3rd, 2012 03:45)

The US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) has notified US Congress of a possible foreign military sale of 26 assault amphibious vehicles (AAV) to Brazil.

Assault Vehicles

The US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) has notified US Congress of a possible foreign military sale of 26 assault amphibious vehicles (AAV) to Brazil.

Under the estimated $233m foreign military sale (FMS) programme, Brazil has also requested 26 AAVs/reliability, availability and maintainability/rebuild to standard (RAM/RS), with ancillary equipment, and machine guns as well as spare and repair parts, support equipment, tools and test equipment.

The proposed package also includes options for associated parts, equipment, training and logistical support.

Additional support requested along with the sale includes modernisation of Brazil's existing AAVs to the RAM/RS configuration, weapons and ammunition in addition to technical data and publications and other logistics support related elements.

The potential sale of assault amphibious vehicles is expected to boost Brazil's security while continuing to enhance its political stability and economic progress in South America.

Aimed to enhance the Brazilian Navy's current inventory of amphibious vehicles, the requested vehicles will provide improved naval operational amphibious capability to support national defence operations.

Powered by a 400hp turbocharged multi-fuel, liquid cooled V-8 diesel engine, the AAV7A1 used by the US Marine Corps (USMC) features MK19 40mm grenade launcher (K4) and a .50 machine gun (K6) in a coaxial mount as well as auto fire suppression and NBC protection system for enhanced survivability.

Additional features of the vehicle includes all-welded aluminium hull to protect crew from small arms fire, shell splinters and flash bums as well as enhanced applique armour (EAAK).


Image: The US Marine Corps's Armoured Assault Vehicles heading towards land from sea surface. Photo: courtesy of Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel E Smith, US Navy.