BAE delivers two blocks to Royal Australian Navy’s AWD programme

26 May 2015 (Last Updated May 26th, 2015 18:30)

BAE Systems has delivered two further air warfare destroyer (AWD) blocks for the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN) Hobart-class AWD programme.

AWD block

BAE Systems has delivered two further air warfare destroyer (AWD) blocks for the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN) Hobart-class AWD programme.

Built by AWD Alliance, the air warfare destroyer programme, known as SEA 4000, will deliver three advanced multirole vessels.

BAE Systems Maritime director Bill Saltzer said: "Our AWD Project team has again delivered a quality product, on schedule.

"Both blocks (111 and 415) for ship three were accepted by AWD lead shipbuilder ASC following inspections at the Williamstown shipyard prior to dispatch."

Construction of the remaining eight blocks for the third Hobart destroyer, HMAS Sydney, is expected to be completed early next year.

The three AWDs HMAS Hobart, HMAS Brisbane and HMAS Sydney will replace the FFGs of the RAN.

The $8bn Hobart-class AWD programme, which is one of the largest defence projects ever undertaken in Australia, aims to deliver an affordable, effective, flexible and sustainable air warfare destroyer platform to the RAN.

"Our AWD Project team has again delivered a quality product, on schedule."

RAN launched the first of three destroyers, Hobart, earlier this month at the Port River wharf in Adelaide.

These vessels will provide air defence for vessels, land-based forces and infrastructure in coastal lines. They will be capable of defending and destroying missiles and aircraft within a range of 150km.

The hull blocks of three destroyers are being constructed at three shipyards, including ASC in Osborne, BAE Systems in Melbourne, and Forgacs in Newcastle.

A total of 31 blocks are being constructed for each ship, 70% are built by BAE Systems and Forgacs, while the remaining blocks will be manufactured by ASC.


Image: Manufactured at BAE Systems' Williamstown shipyard, the further AWD blocks are intended for the construction of HMAS Sydney. Photo: courtesy of AE Systems.