The Australian Minister for Defence Science and Personnel, the Hon Warren Snowdon MP, has reinforced the need for collaboration in the field of science and technology between the Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) and the United Kingdom and France.

During a series of technical meetings this week in London and Paris, Mr. Snowdon said that Australia’s defence science relationship with Britain and France was increasingly important given the rapidly developing nature of technology.

The DSTIO maintains a strong relationship with the UK through its Anglo-Australian memorandum of understanding (MOU) on science and technology (AAMOST).

Snowdon said that there were over 50 collaborative projects underway.

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“The DSTO have three staff posted to the UK under AAMOST with two more planned by the end of the year, and there is one UK staff member posted to DSTO,” said Snowdon.

Minister Snowdon also met defence science officials in Paris.

Australian and France maintain four formal technical arrangements (AA) led by a recently renewed arrangement with the Delegation Generale pour l’Armement (DGA).

“These DSTO arrangements with France cover a range of significant radar technologies, including Australia’s successful over-the-horizon wide-area radar surveillance network,” said Snowdon. “These agreements are modest but expanding,” said Snowdon.

Other collaborative work involves specialist repair processes, high-frequency surface-wave (HFSW) radar, new generation attack helicopters and submarines.

By Daniel Garrun.