General Dynamics to support US Navy’s AMDR programme

27 February 2014 (Last Updated February 27th, 2014 18:30)

Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems has awarded a contract to General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems to support the engineering and manufacturing development of the US Navy’s next-generation integrated air and missile defense radar (AMDR).

Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems has awarded a contract to General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems to support the engineering and manufacturing development of the US Navy's next-generation integrated air and missile defense radar (AMDR).

The company will support Raytheon in developing, integrating and testing of an open, highly scalable and energy efficient advanced radar system capable of detecting ballistic missiles and air and surface targets.

The contract has a maximum potential value of $250.1m over ten years if all options are exercised.

General Dynamics mission integration systems division integrated platform integration vice president and general manager Carlo Zaffanella said: "With our years of open architecture and radar technology experience, we are well positioned to support Raytheon's delivery of the most modular, scalable and capable radar to the Navy to better protect its fleet."

General Dynamics mission integration systems division vice president and general manager Mike Tweed-Kent said: "By building on our proven open architecture design philosophy and business model, General Dynamics will continue to provide solutions that are flexible, more capable and have low lifecycle costs."

AMDR is the US Navy's next-generation integrated air and missile defence radar designed for installation on the navy's Flight III Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) destroyers beginning in 2016. The radar features an S-band radar, an X-band radar and a radar suite controller (RSC), which provides S and X-band radar resource management, coordination and interface to the Aegis combat system.

Raytheon has started to build, integrate and test the AMDR-S digital receivers/exciters (DREX) and digital beam forming (DBF) subsystems for integration into the AMDR engineering development model (EDM) radar. Work is being carried out at the company's facilities in Virginia, San Diego, Minnesota, Arizona, and Hawaii, US.

Defence Technology