GE offers its LM2500 gas turbines for US Navy’s FFG(X) frigates

13 April 2018 (Last Updated April 13th, 2018 12:47)

GE Marine has offered to supply its LM2500 range of gas turbines for 20 new FFG(X) frigates that are currently planned for procurement by the US Navy.

GE Marine has offered to supply its LM2500 range of gas turbines for 20 new FFG(X) frigates that are currently planned for procurement by the US Navy.

The LM2500 line of marine gas turbines includes the base 25MW LM2500, the 30MW LM2500+ and the 35MW LM2500+G4 units.

The systems are expected to meet the speed and power requirements of the newest US Navy frigates.

GE Marine’s turbines are noted to possess superior power density and are grade A shock-tested.

The use of gas turbines on-board naval ships is said to enable a higher level of availability, while ensuring lower weight and volume and minimising maintenance requirements.

"The LM2500 marine gas turbine is a simple-cycle, two-shaft, high-performance engine that has been developed based on the company’s CF6-6 aircraft engines."

The average top speed of a frigate, excluding the littoral combat ship (LCS), is typically between 28k and 30k.

According to the company, the vessels can easily attain such as speed using GE’s 35MW LM2500+G4 or a smaller gas turbine.

GE Marine already currently provides 97% of the commissioned propulsion gas turbines in the US Navy fleet, thereby demonstrating its experience at sea across a number of considered FFG(X) frigate platforms.

The LM2500 marine gas turbine is a simple-cycle, two-shaft, high-performance engine that has been developed based on the company’s CF6-6 aircraft engines.

It comprises a gas generator, power turbine, attached fuel and lube oil pumps, and a fuel control and speed governing system, as well as associated inlet and exhaust sections.

The turbine also features lube and scavenge systems, in addition to a number of controls and devices for starting and monitoring engine operation.

GE Marine has supplied and installed 1,450 gas turbines on-board 646 naval vessels to date, which have been deployed by a total of 35 navies worldwide.