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March 9, 2022

FRCSW to perform major in-service repair on CMV-22 Osprey aircraft

The total cost of repair works on the aircraft is expected to be $390,500.

Fleet Readiness Center Southwest (FRCSW) has undertaken a major in-service repair (ISR) on a CMV-22 Osprey long-range tiltrotor aircraft that suffered a mishap.

On 13 January, the aircraft was inducted for the ISR, which is also called ‘repairs outside of scheduled maintenance’.

The aircraft is assigned to Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron 30 (VRM-30).

Built by Boeing, the $75m Osprey aircraft’s inner composite skin on the right side suffered a 4ft x 2ft crack, as well as other minor composite damages during a mishap.

A safety investigation is currently underway.

FRCSW, Fleet Support Team (FST), V-22 Joint Program Office (PMA-275) and industry partners have come up with a repair plan to return the aircraft to its squadron.

The repair works will see the involvement of electricians, four sheet metal mechanics, quality assurance and planner, other mechanics and estimator personnel.

The team will work in collaboration with the Fleet Support Team (FST) and Boeing’s engineering departments.

FRCSW V-22 production manager Michael Dixon said: “This is the first major ISR and first mishap aircraft my team has performed on a CMV-22.

“The labour-intense repair would require about 70 days and more than 2,800 man-hours to complete, with sheet metal work taking most of those hours.”

According to FRCSW sheet metal mechanic work lead John Sandoval, more than 1,200 fasteners have already been separated by more than 42ft of composite inner skin to composite outer skin.

The FRCSW planning department noted that the repair is estimated to cost a total of $390,500.

PMA-275 programme manager colonel Brian Taylor said: “These capabilities are what really makes Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), the FST and the PMA-275 programme so incredibly important to this community because we have the ability to take care of our own stuff and keep these assets in the fight.”

Once the repair works conclude, the aircraft will be handed over to the VRM-30 squadron.

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