First group of US Navy’s SurgeMain Reservists arrive at PSNS & IMF

20 July 2020 (Last Updated July 20th, 2020 14:11)

The first group of US Navy Reservists have arrived at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF).

First group of US Navy’s SurgeMain Reservists arrive at PSNS & IMF
The first group of US Navy Reservists assigned to PSNS & IMF Detachment Everett have arrived to begin their mobilisation.  Credit: Scott Hansen, PSNS & IMF.

The first group of US Navy Reservists have arrived at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF).

Deployed under the navy’s Surge Maintenance (SurgeMain) programme, personnel will support ship maintenance at the shipyards.

The US Navy has assigned 676 SurgeMain reservists to serve PSNS & IMF sites. SurgeMain sailors come with technical and trade experience.

PSNS & IMF Detachment Everett officer in charge commander Aaron Coudray said: “We have a highly-diverse group of sailors with a wide range of backgrounds.

“Their experience will give us the benefit of learning new ways to do things, of having fresh eyes.”

The arrival of SurgeMain reservists will take place in four-week phases and run through to September this year.

They are on one-year mobilisation orders, which may be extended or revised as per further requirements.

Personnel are scheduled to work in a variety of shops and codes across PSNS & IMF and its detachments.

PSNS & IMF SurgeMain officer-in-charge LCDR Michael Joye said: “Each of our shops and detachments have unique aspects to them.

“Our job is to find the right talent for the right job. We are very adaptable to every situation because they are highly trained. When life changes, they change.”

Established in 2005, SurgeMain comprises 2,200 enlisted reserve sailors and 210 reserve officers to serve 75 units of the navy’s shipyard workforce when required.

Earlier this month, about 1,629 reservists under the US Navy’s SurgeMain programme were mobilised to support the backlog work caused by the Covid-19 pandemic at four public shipyards.