UK Dstl supports development of CAMM weapon system

16 October 2018 (Last Updated October 16th, 2018 11:29)

UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) personnel have supported the development of an advanced air defence missile system for the Royal Navy.

UK Dstl supports development of CAMM weapon system
Sea Ceptor launch from HMS Argyll. Credit: MBDA.

UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) personnel have supported the development of an advanced air defence missile system for the Royal Navy.

The next-generation common anti-air modular missile (CAMM) has been manufactured by MBDA under a multi-million pound contract.

Equipped with the capability to defend against anti-ship cruise missiles, aircraft and other sophisticated and emerging threats, the CAMM system will also be used by the British Army.

Dstl Air Defence Weapons Team representative said: “Since its conception, Dstl and its predecessors have been involved throughout the development and procurement of both the Sea and Land Ceptor.

“Initial studies were conducted to define future capability needs, followed by a series of technology demonstrator projects, with Dstl providing technical direction to help ensure the end product was exploitable into the Ceptor projects.”

“Initial studies were conducted to define future capability needs, followed by a series of technology demonstrator projects, with Dstl providing technical direction.”

In May, the Royal Navy completed acceptance firing trials for the maritime application of CAMM system, which resulted in an initial operating capability for the service’s Type 23 Duke-class frigate HMS Argyll.

In addition, the British Army completed a firing of the Land Ceptor CAMM from a pre-production launch vehicle. The new ground-based air defence missile will be used as a replacement for the army’s Rapier system.

Designed to replace the British Navy’s Sea Wolf weapon system, the Sea Ceptor missile has been designed to provide local-area air defence to the Type 23 and Type 26 class frigates.

Providing 360° coverage with a high degree of manoeuvrability, both CAMM variants use new seeker and datalink technology intended for accuracy.

Associated radar systems are used to track threats and the datalink is then used to update the missile with the necessary location. The active radar seeker of the CAMM weapon system can then take over missile guidance.