Canadian Navy’s first AOPS assembled at Halifax

13 December 2017 (Last Updated December 13th, 2017 11:33)

Irving Shipbuilding has commenced the assembly of the Royal Canadian Navy's (RCN) first Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS), the future HMCS Harry DeWolf, at its shipyard in Halifax.

Canadian Navy’s first AOPS assembled at Halifax
The Canadian Navy’s future HMCS Harry DeWolf being assembled at Halifax Shipyard. Credit: Irving Shipbuilding Inc / CNW Group Ltd.

Irving Shipbuilding has commenced the assembly of the Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) first Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS), the future HMCS Harry DeWolf, at its shipyard in Halifax.

The bow section of the first vessel was shifted on heavy lift transporters from the shipyard’s indoor shipbuilding facility to the land level outside.

“Having the future HMCS Harry DeWolf assembled at land level is a significant milestone for the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the AOPS programme, and our 1,800 shipbuilders.”

Irving Shipbuilding is set to continue work on the project over the coming weeks in order to fully join the assembled part to the bow mega-block, and its components to the centre and stern mega-blocks, which were previously moved to land level in July.

The company will continue further outfitting of Harry DeWolf after all three sections of the navy vessel are successfully joined.

Irving Shipbuilding president Kevin McCoy said: “As the first ship of the class, having the future HMCS Harry DeWolf assembled at land level is a significant milestone for the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the AOPS programme, and our 1,800 shipbuilders.”

The US Navy’s first AOPS is slated to be launched at the Halifax Shipyard in mid-2018.

The future HMCS Margaret Brooke is also currently being built for the navy at the shipyard.

In addition, the steel cutting ceremony for the third vessel of the class, the future HMCS Max Bernays, is scheduled for later this month.

The Canadian Navy originally laid the keel for the Harry DeWolf-class lead ship on 9 June last year, officially marking the beginning of the vessel’s construction.