BAE and UK Government propose transfer technology for Australia

27 November 2017 (Last Updated November 27th, 2017 12:29)

BAE Systems and the UK Government have proposed to offer design capabilities and transfer technology for Australia if selected for SEA 5000 programme.

BAE and UK Government propose transfer technology for Australia
The Type 26 Global Combat Ship-Australia. Credit: BAE Systems.

BAE Systems and the UK Government have proposed to offer design capabilities and transfer technology for Australia if selected for SEA 5000 programme.

The Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) SEA 5000 programme has been established with the intention of building nine next-generation frigates.

BAE Systems noted it intended to transfer latest and advanced technologies and designs in order to ensure that the Australian industry can develop formidable and flexible warships to protect the nation’s borders and strategic assets.

"The transfer of data and the development of the digital shipyard will be important in the development of an enduring industry that will employ generations of Australians."

More than 5,000 ‘work years’ of latest technical design will be transferred to Australia to support the indigenous shipbuilding projects in the country, featuring a total worth of roughly $1.5bn.

The transfer of data and digital design capability will help support the development of a continuous naval shipbuilding capability in Australia, thereby ensuring that the local industry has the potential to develop the future frigates.

In addition, it is anticipated to ensure that the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) vessels can be upgraded and supported during their long service periods.

The unprecedented transfer of intellectual property will also include all ship parts, materials, systems and sub systems used to construct the Type 26 frigate.

The Australian industry will know how to both construct and optimise the frigate over its lifespan as a result of the arrangement, thereby potentially enhancing its stealth, flexibility and performance.

BAE is currently proposing the Global Combat Ship-Australia (GCS-A) for its SEA 5000 bid, which will see the replacement of the existing Anzac class frigates.

The GCS-A will provide the RAN with an upgraded submarine hunting capability, which will also serve as an extremely capable multi-role combatant both in undersea warfare and across air and surface domains.

BAE Systems chief executive Glynn Phillips said: “The GCS-A is a mature design that provides both stealth and flexibility to meet the future operational requirements of the RAN.

“The transfer of data and the development of the digital shipyard will be important in the development of an enduring industry that will employ generations of Australians.”