BAE Systems to provide carrier landing systems sustainment to US Navy
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BAE Systems to provide carrier landing systems sustainment to US Navy

05 Oct 2021 (Last Updated October 5th, 2021 12:33)

The contract will see the company develop, test and upgrade the AN/SPN-46(V) automatic carrier landing system.

BAE Systems to provide carrier landing systems sustainment to US Navy
The five-year, $68.5m IDIQ contract will see BAE Systems support US aircraft carriers. Credit: BAE Systems.

The US Navy has awarded a five-year, $68.5m indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract to BAE Systems.

The IDIQ contract will allow BAE Systems to continue providing lifecycle sustainment, integration, as well as engineering services to support US aircraft carriers.

Under the Air Traffic Control and Landing Systems (ATC&LS) Engineering Products & Technical Services (EPTS) contract, the company will use its expertise to design, produce, equip, test, analyse, sustain, and modernise the AN/SPN-46(V) automatic carrier landing system.

BAE Systems Integrated Defense Solutions business vice-president and general manager Lisa Hand said: “With this win, BAE Systems retains a key air traffic control contract that we have held since 1973 to provide industry-leading systems integration capabilities and solutions that ensure the safety of critical carrier-based landing systems.”

For the sustainment of the critical landing systems, BAE Systems’ employees use proven methodologies and leverage expertise related to systems engineering and software development.

Work under the contract will enhance hardware reliability, system precision, and provide a certified landing system.

It will also help reduce downtime via onsite and remote technical support.

The AN/SPN-46 was selected by the US Navy to provide safe and reliable final approach and landing guidance for aircraft.

It guides the helicopter or a fighter jet to land safely onto the deck of an aircraft carrier.