BAE Systems to compete for cyber engineering task orders

1 March 2019 (Last Updated March 1st, 2019 10:55)

BAE Systems has been selected by the US Navy to bid for a potential indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract to deliver cyber engineering services to naval, joint and national agencies.

BAE Systems to compete for cyber engineering task orders
BAE Systems is one of ten companies selected to compete for future task orders awarded under the IDIQ, which is being managed by Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic. Credit: BAE Systems, Inc.

BAE Systems has been selected by the US Navy to bid for a potential indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract to deliver cyber engineering services to naval, joint and national agencies.

As well as BAE Systems, the US Navy has picked nine other companies to compete for future task orders awarded under a seven-and-a-half year IDIQ contract with a ceiling value of $898m.

The contract involves lifecycle service support for command, control, communications, computers, and combat systems.

The agencies may also award further task orders to improve the capabilities and security of various signals intelligence, imagery intelligence, electronic warfare, surveillance, and reconnaissance systems.

BAE Systems Integrated Defense Solutions business vice-president Kris Busch said: “This award creates new opportunities for us to showcase our expertise in cyber threat exploitation and analysis, computer network defence, and security-focused systems engineering.

“We are introducing advanced analytics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning solutions that will improve our nation’s ability to defend against future land, sea, air, space, cyber, and electromagnetic warfare threats.”

“We are also introducing new advanced analytics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning solutions that will further improve our nation’s ability to defend against future land, sea, air, space, cyber, and electromagnetic warfare threats.”

The IDIQ contract is managed by the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic.

The scope of the contract is also likely to include development, testing, production, and deployment of next-generation autonomous and unmanned missions systems.

In January, BAE Systems won two contracts from the US Navy. The first one, a $79.8m contract, requires the company to provide assistance in maintaining and operating multiple electronic, communication, and computing platforms across the Pacific Ocean.

The second contract involves maintenance and modernisation of Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86).