Upgraded DMR radios to boost US Navy's network communications capacity


General Dynamics (GD) is upgrading its four-channel digital modular radios (DMR) integrated on US Navy vessels with high-frequency dynamic routing (HFDR) software, in a bid to add another four virtual channels.

The new high-frequency virtual channel exploitation software increases the communications capacity of DMR to 16 virtual channels when operated in the HF line-of-sight and ultra-high frequency satellite communications frequencies.

"As the first software-defined radio to be used by the US military, [the] DMR continues to produce long-term cost-effectiveness for the navy."

The upgrades will quadruple the network communications capacity on navy vessels, without the addition of further hardware or modifications to the configuration in shipboard radio rooms.

GD Mission Systems president Chris Marzilli said: "As the first software-defined radio to be used by the US military, [the] DMR continues to produce long-term cost-effectiveness for the navy, because these technology advancements use software, avoiding time-consuming and cost-intensive hardware replacements."

GD is also planning to integrate mobile-user objective system waveform into DMR radios, which would provide the same level of voice clarity and connection speeds found on mobiles.

The US Navy installed the DMR on surface and subsurface ships and a range of land-based locations in 1998. Currently, 500 secure, four-channel DMR radios support navy operations worldwide.

Aimed at offering improved functionality and interoperability, the radios accommodate next-generation communications and integrated waveforms, as well as advanced network communications waveforms.