Rosborough Boats to deliver multi-role rescue vessels for Canada's AOPS vessels


Nova Scotia-based Rosborough Boats has received a new contract to deliver multi-role rescue boats for the Royal Canadian Navy’s arctic and offshore patrol ships (AOPS).

The $7.3m contract was awarded by Irving Shipbuilding, and will see Rosborough Boats develop two of its Rough Water 8.5m rigid-hull inflatable boats (RHIB) for each of the six AOPSs.

Rosborough Boats president Heaton Rosborough said: “Working with Irving Shipbuilding to supply our Rough Water 8.5s for AOPS reinforces the purpose of the NSS by equipping the Royal Canadian Navy with high-quality enhanced equipment best matched to their current and future mission sets, while employing Canadians and bolstering the Canadian Marine Industry.

“Rosborough will capitalise on this successful relationship to further market our line of vessels to other programmes in the Royal Canadian Navy as well as navies and coast guards around the world.”

Rough Water 8.5 is a highly adaptable seaworthy RHIB, and will be deployed along with the AOPS vessels for operation in harsh arctic environments.

The RHIBs will be primarily used as fast rescue boats deployed for marshalling and towing lifeboats, and assisting the navy’s enhanced naval boarding party in a support capacity.

"Rosborough will capitalise on this successful relationship to further market our line of vessels to other programmes in the Royal Canadian Navy."

The AOPSs are being built as part of the Government of Canada's National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS), and will be the first to be constructed under Irving Shipbuilding's NSS combat vessels package.

Irving Shipbuilding has committed to invest more than $1.3bn in more than 300 Canadian organisations as part of the NSS. 

Canada's first two AOPSs, the future HMCS Harry DeWolf and HMCS Margaret Brooke, are currently being built by a team of 1,500 shipbuilders at Irving Shipbuilding's Halifax Shipyard, Nova Scotia.

The first AOPS is slated to be delivered to the Royal Canadian Navy in 2018.


Image:  Halifax Shipyard worker cuts components for Canada’s first Arctic and offshore patrol ship. Photo: courtesy of Irving Shipbuilding.