USS Coronado (LCS 4) completes total ship survivability trial

11 February 2016 (Last Updated February 11th, 2016 18:30)

The US Navy's Independence-class USS Coronado littoral combat ship (LCS 4) has announced completion of total ship survivability trial (TSST) off the coast of California.

USS Coronado

The US Navy's Independence-class USS Coronado littoral combat ship (LCS 4) has announced completion of total ship survivability trial (TSST) off the coast of California.

The test included a series of events featuring the crew handling realistic damage simulations, including fire, smoke, electrical failure, flooding, ruptured piping, and structural failure.

The simulation of such realistic scenarios are aimed at training the crew to face and combat real-time emergencies before being inducted into the ship, which is scheduled later this year.

"Initial indications are that Coronado's performance met, and in multiple cases exceeded, the survivability requirements for this small surface combatant."

LCS programme manager captain Tom Anderson said: "Initial indications are that Coronado's performance met, and in multiple cases exceeded, the survivability requirements for this small surface combatant."

The TSST forms a part of the Live-Fire Test and Evaluation programme, along with the full ship shock trial scheduled to be conducted in June this year.

It is aimed to assess the ship's systems and procedures following a simulated conventional weapon hit.

The ship's ability is tested on a range of areas including combating damage, restore and continue mission capability, and care for personnel casualties.

The test also displays the functionality of the survivability features incorporated into the design of the ship.

USS Coronado commanding officer commander Troy Fendrick said: "It also provided sailors, from the deckplate level, the opportunity to provide critical input to the LCS programme office, which will result in the improvement of overall ship survivability."

Commissioned in April 2014, the 127.4m-long vessel is propelled by gas turbines, water jets and diesel generators to achieve a speed of up to 47k.

The US Navy's LCS programme aims to fill navy gaps in operational war-fighting requirements, specifically to defeat littoral threats, and provide access and dominance in coastal waters.

The LCS-class consists of the Freedom and Independence variants, which are developed by two industry teams.

A team led by Lockheed Martin is building the Freedom variant, while Austal USA is constructing the Independence variant.


Image: USS Coronado. Photo: courtesy of U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Debra Daco/Released.