USCG commissions 16th Sentinel-class fast response cutter Winslow Griesser

16 March 2016 (Last Updated March 16th, 2016 18:30)

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has commissioned its 16th fast response cutter (FRC), Winslow Griesser, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

FRC

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has commissioned its 16th fast response cutter (FRC), Winslow Griesser, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Built under the USCG's Sentinel-class FRC programme, Winslow Griesser is the fourth FRC constructed by Bollinger shipyard. It was delivered in December last year.

This vessel was christened after Winslow W Griesser, a keeper of the Buffalo, New York, lifesaving station. He was awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal for rescuing a man thrown into the sea when two large boats broke loose from their moorings in 1900.

“The 154ft-long vessels boast flank speed of 28k, while also featuring the latest command, control, communications and computer technology.”

Set to replace the aging 110ft-long Island-class cutters, the Sentinel-class FRCs can house a crew of 22 and deploy rigid-hull inflatable boats (RHIB) to carry out rescue and interception missions.

The 154ft-long vessels boast flank speed of 28k, while also featuring the latest command, control, communications and computer technology, and a stern launch system for the vessel's 26ft cutter boat.

Designed to link the capability to comply with the potential mission necessities, the FPVs are capable of supporting a range of missions, including port, waterways and coastal security; fishery patrols; search-and-rescue; and national defence.

Additionally, the cutters can be used for potential drug and migrant interdiction missions.

The vessels are equipped with advanced command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance equipment; stern cutter boat launch; and have enhanced habitability and seakeeping.

Earlier this month, the USCG took delivery of the 17th FRC, Donald Horsley.


Image: The US Coast Guard cutter Winslow Griesse during the commissioning ceremony. Photo: courtesy of US Coast Guard photo by Ricardo Castrodad.