US ONR contracts Battelle and Halyard Health to produce new product for limb injuries

12 June 2016 (Last Updated June 12th, 2016 18:30)

Battelle and Halyard Health have been contracted by the US Office of Naval Research (ONR) to co-develop a medical device that can help reduce the loss of tissue in severely injured limbs.

Battelle and Halyard Health have been contracted by the US Office of Naval Research (ONR) to co-develop a medical device that can help reduce the loss of tissue in severely injured limbs.

The new product will be developed as part of the Acute Care Cover for Severely Injured Limbs (ACCSIL) project, which will include the development of a conformal cover.

The cover will be designed to protect the injured limb, while providing a therapeutic cocktail that mitigates damage and promotes tissue survival.

"When a limb is severely injured, the best practise is to encase it as-is, and get it to a surgical theatre as fast as possible."

A prototype of the device is expected to be delivered next year.

Battelle consumer industrial and medical technologies group vice-president Joe Berger said: "When a limb is severely injured, the best practise is to encase it as-is, and get it to a surgical theatre as fast as possible.

"Believe it or not, what's being used now to address such injuries actually promotes the growth of harmful microorganisms and necrotic tissue."

Battelle's planned small, lightweight device will be known as the Protective Oxygenating Wrap for Enhanced Recovery (POWER), and will feature wound dressing materials, active medical ingredients, and a oxygen delivery system.

It shields the wound from microbe infection while promoting growth of tissue by delivery oxygen to the wound, resulting in improved recovery time and quality of life of the injured soldier.

ONR programme manager Tim Bentley said: "It will be carried by the corpsman and medics and administered at the point of injury on the battlefield.

"It will be designed to be light-weight and keep the wound fresh and maintain tissue condition for up to 72 hours, which is particularly important as we plan for future scenarios where prolonged field care will be required."

In 2013, Battelle worked on a $23m US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency project to develop a device to treat sepsis.