US Navy’s USS Ross intercepts ballistic missile using SM-3

20 October 2015 (Last Updated October 20th, 2015 18:30)

The US Navy's Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) has successfully intercepted a ballistic missile in the North Atlantic Ocean.

USS Rose

The US Navy's Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) has successfully intercepted a ballistic missile in the North Atlantic Ocean.

The interception took place during the Maritime Theater Missile Defense (MTMD) Forum's at-sea demonstration (ASD).

The development marked the firing of a standard missile-3 (SM-3) Block IA guided interceptor on a non-US range for the first time. It is also said to be the first intercept of a ballistic missile threat in the European theatre.

During the test, Hebrides Range launched a short-range Terrier Orion ballistic missile target and two anti-ship cruise missiles fired at the coalition task group.

As a response, USS Ross fired a SM-3 and engaged the ballistic missile target in space.

"ASD-15 shows that with communication, collaboration and commitment nations can come together and flawlessly defend against a complex threat scenario."

The UK-hosted ASD-15 is a multi-national demonstration of coalition integrated air and missile defence capability.

US 6th Fleet commander vice admiral James Foggo said: "ASD-15 shows that with communication, collaboration and commitment nations can come together and flawlessly defend against a complex threat scenario."

The event involved ships and aircraft from countries, including Canada, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, the UK, and the US.

Germany delivers personnel to augment the Forum's multi-national Combined Task Group staff.

Raytheon-built SM-3 missile is capable of destroying incoming ballistic missile threats in space, with an impact equivalent to a 10t truck travelling at 600mph.


Image: USS Ross fires a SM-3 as part of an at-sea demonstration showcasing its ability to intercept a short-range ballistic missile target. Photo: courtesy of navy photo by mass communication specialist 1st class Mike Wright / Released.