US Navy’s JCREW programme receives approval for operational testing

4 May 2015 (Last Updated May 4th, 2015 18:30)

The US Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) has received approval for the operational testing of the joint counter radio-controlled improvised explosive device (IED) electronic warfare (JCREW) programme.

The US Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) has received approval for the operational testing of the joint counter radio-controlled improvised explosive device (IED) electronic warfare (JCREW) programme.

The JCREW system has been developed using a modular, open architecture platform, which permits rapid improvements in system performance to counter the frequently evolving IED threat.

As part of the new development, the Commander Operational Test and Evaluation Force will carry out the testing to verify the programme's effectiveness and suitability, and it is expected to enter initial production later this year.

Expeditionary missions programme manager, captain Aaron Peters said: "The navy is developing the JCREW system to protect the warfighter on patrol, in vehicles, or in forward operating bases from advanced radio-controlled improvised explosive devices (RCIEDs)."

"The navy is developing the JCREW system to protect the warfighter on patrol, in vehicles, or in forward operating bases."

The JCREW programme is comprised of three variants that offer critical support to navy service members.

Within these, the dismounted variant can be carried through backpack and the mounted variant can be attached to tactical vehicles, such as the Humvee and the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle.

The fixed variant will deliver protection at static locations, such as buildings, entry control points or forward operating bases.

These systems are capable of providing a 'protective bubble' around troops, which will prevent the initiation of an improvised explosive device within a lethal range.

This programme is managed by the Expeditionary Missions Program Office as part of the Naval Sea Systems Command's Directorate for Acquisition and Commonality.