US Navy receives future USS Milwaukee LCS

19 October 2015 (Last Updated October 19th, 2015 18:30)

The US Navy has received its sixth littoral combat ship, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS 5), from the Lockheed Martin-led team in a ceremony held at the Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard, Wisconsin, US.

Milwaukee

The US Navy has received its sixth littoral combat ship, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS 5), from the Lockheed Martin-led team in a ceremony held at the Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard, Wisconsin, US.

USS Milwaukee is the third Freedom-variant LCS to join the naval fleet and the vessel has been named Milwauke to honour the largest city in the state of Wisconsin.

LCS programme manager Captain Tom Anderson said: "With each LCS delivered, we have succeeded in driving down costs by incorporating lessons learned to provide the navy with a highly capable and flexible ship.

"We are honoured to place the Milwaukee in the able hands of her crew as they set sail for the ship's commissioning."

The new warship is expected to be commissioned on 21 November.

After the commissioning, the vessel will be homeported in San Diego with sister ships USS Freedom (LCS 1), USS Independence (LCS 2), USS Fort Worth (LCS 3), USS Coronado (LCS 4) and the future USS Jackson (LCS 6).

"We are honoured to place the Milwaukee in the able hands of her crew as they set sail for the ship's commissioning."

Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One commander Captain Warren R Buller II said: "We are pleased to receive the future USS Milwaukee into the LCS class.

"Milwaukee is scheduled to conduct full ship shock trials before joining her sister littoral combat ships in their homeport of San Diego."

The LCS ships are fast, agile and focused-mission surface combatants designed to provide capable, cost-effective solutions to gain, sustain and exploit littoral maritime supremacy for troops.

Capable of reconfiguring for surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare and mine countermeasures, 388ft-long USS Milwaukee will be powered by four axial-flow waterjet engines to improve performance.


Image: A file photo showing USS Milwaukee slides into the Menominee River during a christening ceremony at the Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard. Photo: courtesy of US Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin / Released.