UK Royal Navy’s future hi-tech warship design released

1 September 2015 (Last Updated September 1st, 2015 18:30)

British scientists and engineers have released designs for a high-tech Royal Navy vessel, offering a glimpse of navy's advanced future warships.

British scientists and engineers have released designs for a high-tech Royal Navy vessel, offering a glimpse of navy's advanced future warships.

The design was released by a group of naval electronic systems companies who worked with Startpoint, a group formed to promote the UK's approach to maritime mission systems procurement.

Dubbed Dreadnought 2050, the new vessel could be built from ultra-strong plastic and graphene, and equipped with weapons that fire at the speed of light, architects claimed.

Royal Navy fleet robotics officer commander Steve Prest was quoted by Sky News as saying: "In 2013 the Royal Navy challenged the defence industry to innovate, and to generate new opportunities to give it an operational edge.

"We welcome a project that allows some of Britain's best and brightest young engineers to come up with ideas."

"We therefore welcome a project that allows some of Britain's best and brightest young engineers to come up with ideas on what a warship might look like or be equipped with in 2050."

Dreadnought 2050 would require only 50 crews as it features remote control technology. Currently, warships need at least 200 crew members to operate a vessel.

In addition, the ship features an operation room that offers commanders with an enhanced focus on areas thousands of miles away. A 3D holographic command table in the operations room would allow the crew to rotate and zoom into the battlefield.

The vessel would also have acrylic hull that can be turned translucent to give all-round visibility, laser and electro-magnetic weapons, and a fleet of drones all built on board with a 3D printer.

The design also contains a floodable dock area, capable of deploying troops for amphibious raiding missions and releasing unmanned underwater vehicles to detect mines.