UK Navy’s River-class OPV HMS Tyne completes operational sea training

8 May 2016 (Last Updated May 8th, 2016 18:30)

The UK Navy's River-class off-shore patrol vessel (OPV) HMS Tyne is ready for operational deployment in and around UK waters following the completion of its operational sea training (OST).

HMS Tyne

The UK Navy's River-class off-shore patrol vessel (OPV) HMS Tyne is ready for operational deployment in and around UK waters following the completion of its operational sea training (OST).

The Portsmouth-based vessel was put through intense training for several weeks in the waters of the Firth of Clyde under the direction of Flag Officer Sea Training North (FOST(N)).

During training, the vessel performed a series of exercises, including dealing with fires and floods on-board, providing life-saving assistance to vessels in distress and threats imposed by fast inshore attack craft (FIACs), along with intelligence gathering exercises, navigation and seamanship tasks.

"It has been great to see the team working together to get the most out of training; this is the sort of ethos the Royal Navy is built on."

As part of Salvage Exercise (SALVEX), which is one of the main parts of the training, the entire ship's company conducted a life-saving assistance to a vessel in distress.

Tyne responded to a distress message issued from a sinking vessel by dispatching a reconnaissance team comprising of Pacific 22 sea boats with damage control and first aid experts.

Executive officer lieutenant Craig Clark said: "HMS Tyne has shown she is ready to keep doing what she and her sister ships do throughout the year, ensuring the UK's maritime security and remaining ready to respond.

"It has been great to see the team working together to get the most out of training; this is the sort of ethos the Royal Navy is built on."

HMS Tyne is one of the Royal Navy's four patrol vessels in the Fishery Protection Squadron, which conducts marine enforcement operations along with a range of other duties to ensure the UK's maritime security.


Image: Buoy jumpers connect Tyne to a mooring buoy as part of a seamanship exercise. Photo: courtesy of Royal Navy.