Swedish FMV awards contract to upgrade and modify two Koster-class MCMVs

4 July 2016 (Last Updated July 4th, 2016 18:30)

Saab has been awarded an order from the Swedish Defence Material Administration (FMV) to modify and upgrade the Swedish Navy's two Koster-class mine countermeasures vessels (MCMVs).

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Saab has been awarded an order from the Swedish Defence Material Administration (FMV) to modify and upgrade the Swedish Navy's two Koster-class mine countermeasures vessels (MCMVs).

The Skr147m ($17.41m) contract covers the 2016-2017 period, and comes with options for additional orders between 2017 and 2018, which will amount to an extra Skr139m ($16.46m) if exercised.

Under the contract, Saab will perform mission system modifications and renovations, as well as enhance the propulsion system, including chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) detection and protection functionality improvements.

Saab Kockums head Gunnar Wieslander said: "Sweden is a world leader in mine countermeasures.

"We have a long tradition of constructing mine countermeasures vessels with glass fibre hulls. This material not only gives excellent operational capabilities but also provides high availability and low lifecycle costs."

Modification work on the naval vessels will be carried out at the company's facility in Karlskrona, Sweden.

"Sweden is a world leader in mine countermeasures."

The Swedish Navy's Koster-class MCMVs form part of a series of vessels launched at shipbuilding company Kockums (formerly Karlskronavarvet) during the 1980s.

In the early 2000s, the vessels were modified to add new capabilities, including remotely operated vehicles (ROVs).

The vessels can be engaged in missions such as traditional mine-hunting, sweeping and clearance tasks, as well as assist in anti-submarine operations.

Last month, Saab received an order from the Swedish FMV to provide advanced anti-submarine warfare training, including the AUV62 autonomous underwater vehicle in training configuration.


Image: The Swedish Navy's HMS Koster minesweeper. Photo: courtesy of Mark Harkin via Wikipedia.