Spanish Navy to conduct research on graphene use in ballistic protection systems

27 January 2016 (Last Updated January 27th, 2016 18:30)

The Spanish Navy has partnered with Cartagena Polytechnic University to conduct research on the use of graphene in ballistic protection systems.

Graphene

The Spanish Navy has partnered with Cartagena Polytechnic University to conduct research on the use of graphene in ballistic protection systems.

Graphene, by virtue of its atomic structure, is believed to allow resistance of up to 100 times more than steel.

The result is expected to produce a series of nanocomposites, materials based on nanotechnology, which could shield against a ballistic impact with live fire.

"The result is expected to produce a series of nanocomposites, which could shield against a ballistic impact with live fire"

The component is said to be incorporated in designing a futuristic and revolutionary bulletproof vests.

Marine Corps Eastern 'Tercio' and the Algameca Naval Station are the navy units that are participating in the joint-venture.

The units are set to soon commence the trial and testing of the bulletproof vests, which are composed of graphene material.

The 18-month project will involve a multidisciplinary team of UPCT researchers and the Spanish Ministry of Defense's Weapons and Material Directorate.

To be conducted at Algameca Naval Station, the research which will include the design and manufacture of an experimental integrated ballistic system with live ammunition aligned to Nato specified standards.

Under the current agreement, the Spanish navy has assigned the Marine Corps' Eastern Tercio to assess and test the ballistic protection capability of graphene-based armour-plating, as well as offering personnel and military equipment.

The joint research project is also said to have leveraged on the expertise of the soldiers and commanding officers who have participated in different operational missions.

The Spanish Navy and the UPCT have had a history of collaborations over a decade which resulted in a series of multidisciplinary projects.


Image: The Spanish Navy squadron participating in the joint research at the site. Photo: courtesy of Armada Española.