Royal Australian Navy’s new simulation facility opens in Sydney

12 April 2016 (Last Updated April 12th, 2016 18:30)

A new navy simulation facility has been opened in Sydney to improve training facilities provided to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) technical sailors.

DDG 120

A new navy simulation facility has been opened in Sydney to improve training facilities provided to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) technical sailors.

The purpose-built $90m Navy Training Systems Centre was officially opened at Randwick Barracks and is said to modernise the training imparted to the navy's marine and electronic technicians for their roles in the fleet.

RAN Chief of Navy, vice-admiral Tim Barrett said: "This next-generation training facility will ensure Navy can fully utilise the extraordinary capabilities of both the Canberra class amphibious ships and the Hobart class destroyers."

“Our new amphibious ships and destroyers will be serving Australia's national interests for the next three decades.”

The centre, when fully operational, will use a combination of simulation and modern training systems to train up to 300 students.

According to Barrett, the requirement to conduct trainings at sea will be reduced by the utilisation of simulation and task specific training tools, and will allow more days at sea for advanced group training, and will support government directed operations.

Barett added: "Our new amphibious ships and destroyers will be serving Australia's national interests for the next three decades, which is why this centre will play a vital role underpinning the successful operation of these assets.

"I anticipate an expanded use of these types of facilities in the future, as they provide the navy with an essential capability at a lower total cost over the life of ships."

The training centre can be configured and can be added with more platforms to cater to the navy's evolving training needs.

The building has been constructed ensuring minimal environmental impact, and is supplemented with 100 rooftop photovoltaic panels to facilitate energy self-sufficiency.


Image: HMAS Canberra personnel demonstrate the use of the interactive simulator inside the navy training systems centre. Photo: courtesy of Commonwealth of Australia.