Lockheed Martin Canada receives subcontract from Irving for Arctic ships

8 April 2015 (Last Updated April 8th, 2015 18:30)

Lockheed Martin Canada has been awarded the implementation subcontract by Irving Shipbuilding as command and surveillance system integrator for the Royal Canadian Navy's (RCN) new Harry DeWolf-class of arctic/offshore patrol ships (AOPS).

Lockheed Martin Canada has been awarded the implementation subcontract by Irving Shipbuilding as command and surveillance system integrator for the Royal Canadian Navy's (RCN) new Harry DeWolf-class of arctic/offshore patrol ships (AOPS).

Under this contract worth more than C$170m ($136.14m), Lockheed will carry out the key integration of data and information sources, which will increase the ships' situational awareness and provide command, control and decision support at all levels of command for the new vessels.

Lockheed Martin Canada Mission Systems and Training vice-president and general manager Rosemary Chapdelaine said: "Our team facilitates tight collaboration with the shipyard, subcontractors and the navy, and we are pleased to be moving to the next stage of the AOPS programme on schedule.

"Our ability to coordinate among these stakeholders on complex programmes is our blueprint for success."

"Lockheed will carry out the key integration of data and information sources, which will increase the ships' situational awareness."

Lockheed Martin Canada is a supplier for AOPS prime contractor Irving Shipbuilding, which currently manages four Canada-based subcontractors as part of the AOPS contract.

Irving Shipbuilding president Kevin McCoy said: "We have worked with them over the last three years to find the right command and surveillance solution to best serve the navy in these important ships and to achieve the best overall benefit to Canada."

The company said it was able to leverage its innovative combat management system from the Halifax-class modernisation programme for surveillance purposes on AOPS.

AOPS is expected to equip Canadian forces with six naval ice-capable offshore patrol ships able to assert and enforce sovereignty in Canada's waters. The first ship, HMCS Harry DeWolf, is scheduled for delivery in 2018.